Home Of Pure Retro Movie Love.

Sunday, December 6, 2009

DVD Evaders: Mortuary (1983)

Mortuary was a slasher film released in 1983, but feels unlike anything of the time. The movie has a very unusual vibe and atmosphere. It's a low budget creepfest with a zany performance by newcomer Bill Paxton.

This movie has become a real favorite of mine over the years. It's the kind of picture I can watch over and over, and never be let down by it's charm. Sample dialogue: "Come on Mr. Boogeyman, let's boogie!"

A DVD release is much needed before this film gets lost into obscurity forever.

In addition to that very misleading poster, they also promoted the film with a very misleading trailer. The Hills Have Eyes' Michael Berryman is not in this film:

6 comments:

Mitch said...

Well you know how I feel about this film. If I had a DVD release, I would hold it, and pet it, and squeeze it.......

You & I and Amanda are still the Mortuary appreciation society!

The Film Connoisseur said...

Ive always wanted to see it, that poster always caught my attention at the video store, but its dissapeared into obscurity...and from video shelves. I hope it gets released on dvd at some point, it seems like it would probably be a fun watch.

Keith said...

I know I saw this one years ago on video. The box art is what drew me in. I don't remember much about it though. Would love to see it again.

The Warfreak said...

Never seen it. How big is Paxton's role?

Cinema Du Meep said...

Fairly big. He definitely has a pivotal role in the film.

Cesar Fernandez D said...

"Mortuary" is a basically adequate slasher, with strong echoes of "Happy Birthday to Me" at times, that gets by thanks to some of its acting. Mary Beth McDonough of 'The Waltons' stars as Christie, a college age young woman who lost her father to an "accident" in the family pool. Other characters occasionally bite the dust as Christie gets terrorized by a cloaked and white faced figure who follows her around. Eventually, all is made clear at the mortuary run by a Mr. Andrews (the late, always solid Christopher George in what was sadly his final film role). Now, it's far from hard to figure out whodunit, especially after a red herring has been dealt with, but making this work as a murder mystery may never have been paramount for director Howard Avedis, who wrote and produced the film with his actress wife Marlene Schmidt (who plays the mother of male lead David Wallace, whom you might remember from the Canadian horror favourite "Humongous"). Avedis, a veteran in exploitation, had also been behind such films as "The Teacher" and "The Fifth Floor", and spices up his film with a bit of sex and nudity (although almost certainly not enough to satisfy some tastes); use of graphic violence is very minimal. McDonough is definitely appealing in the central role and her character is the sort for whom you *do* want to root. George's lovely wife Lynda Day George has one of the other major roles as Christie's mother, whom we have our doubts about. And, as often in some of these low budget offerings, there is one breakout star, and that's the always extravagant Bill Paxton, who's a total hoot as the pathetic Paul, a classical music lover who also loves Christie. One extended sequence stands out as poor Christie, who's a sleepwalker, gets stalked and spooked. consulta por internet medico por internet pediatra por internet medico por internet doctor por internet dermatologo por internet veterinario por internet veterinario por internet psychologist online consulta por internet abogado por internet abogado por internet abogado por internet abogado por internet abogado por internet psicologo por internet doctor por internet psicologo por internet abogado por internet abogado por internet One element that is also quite effective is the music score by John Cacavas, as it's very sinister throughout. There isn't too much, overall, that's especially noteworthy about the film, other than some of its principal actors, but it's not bad at all, either, and may fit the bill for die hard genre lovers. The U.S. trailer features a sequence with actor Michael Berryman that, needless to say, didn't make the final cut of the film. Six out of 10.

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